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M. Ann Levett, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools

Savannah-Chatham Co.
Public School System

208 Bull Street
Savannah, GA 31401
(912) 395-5600


Driving Directions:

208 Bull Street
(Admin. Offices)

2 Laura Avenue
(Board Meetings)

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Advanced Placement ® Program (AP®)
The Advanced Placement Program (AP) is an opportunity for students to take college level classes with College Board trained AP teachers while still in high school and without leaving campus.  By taking a national exam, you may earn credit or advanced placement from thousands of colleges and universities in the United States, as well as in more than 30 countries. More information about Advanced Placement programs can be found at www.collegeboard.org.

What are the benefits of taking AP courses?
The work students do in an AP course will help develop skills and study habits vital in college studies.  Students will develop research and analytical skills, improve writing skills, and strategies for testing.    Additionally, research indicates that students who take AP classes score better on SAT/ACT tests, and will have an increased likelihood of graduating from college.  Colleges and universities recognize that applicants with AP experience are much better prepared for the demands of college courses and consider this during application reviews.  Colleges and universities will use AP performance to award college credit or placement in higher-level college courses to match the student’s level of academic preparation for college.

How difficult are AP courses?
Compared to regular high school courses, AP courses are usually more demanding.  Depending on the subject, you will read and write more, analyze and synthesis ideas, solve problems and evaluate material.  The courses move at a fast pace and students can expect more homework than other high school courses. 

What are AP exams like?
Each exam is given in May and is a three hour test of multiple choice and free response questions that require essay writing, problem solving and other critical thinking skills.  All students who take AP classes will take the AP exams.  You will decide which, if any, colleges or universities receive your exam results.  Scoring is conducted by the Educational Testing Service to insure consistency and accuracy.  The Advanced Placement exam is a national standard and is accepted by the majority of colleges and universities in the United States and many other countries.  Grading on the AP exam is on a 1 to 5 scale.  Most of the nation’s colleges and universities award credit or advanced standing to students scoring 3 or higher on exams.

How do I get involved in the AP Program?
Work with your counselor in middle and/or high schools (9th and 10th grades) to help you plan your courses and decide which Honors and AP classes to take. Students should select courses based on interest and academic strengths. 

If you would like more information, please contact your school's AP Coordinator or the District Gifted & Advanced Learning Program Manager, Joy Key-Smith, at (912) 395-1112.